Traces of Tin – The Independent Mine Keeping Tradition Alive in Cornwall

Keeping Cornish Mining Alive

After the tin mining industry started to decline in the 1970’s, Cornwall lost one of its main industries, leaving many of its workers without jobs with families to support. The remains of the industry still stands along the landscape of Cornwall, a reminder of the past heritage of the county. However there is one independent mine that has survived the collapse of the industry. At the end of Cornwall along the cliffs of Zennor, lies Rosevale mine. Rosevale mine is an independent mine, founded by mine enthusiast Mike Shipp. The mine dates back to the 18th century, closing after the Second World War after a shortage of workers and funds. Mike started renovating the mine in the 70’s for a hobby and has been working on it, with 5 freinds since.

The remains of the industry still stands along the landscape of Cornwall, a reminder of the past heritage of the county. However there is one independent mine that has survived the collapse of the industry. At the end of Cornwall along the cliffs of Zennor, lies Rosevale mine. Rosevale mine is an independent mine, founded by mine enthusiast Mike Shipp. The mine dates back to the 18th century, closing after the Second World War after a shortage of workers and funds. Mike started renovating the mine in the 70’s for a hobby and has been working on it, with 5 freinds since.

The remains of the industry still stands along the landscape of Cornwall, a reminder of the past heritage of the county. However there is one independent mine that has survived the collapse of the industry. At the end of Cornwall along the cliffs of Zennor, lies Rosevale mine. Rosevale mine is an independent mine, founded by mine enthusiast Mike Shipp. The mine dates back to the 18th century, closing after the Second World War after a shortage of workers and funds. Mike started renovating the mine in the 70’s for a hobby and has been working on it, with 5 freinds since.

By Maisie Marshall